THE WALL OF THE CROW

Image by Jon Bodsworth

One of the oldest monumental structures on the Giza Plateau is the Wall of the Crow. Believed to have been the original entrance to the Giza Plateau and the dividing line between the sacred precincts of Giza and the surrounding area, the surviving section of the Wall of the Crow is over 600 feet long and over 30 feet high. The megalithic passageway is one of the largest in the ancient world and the megalithic stone over the passageway is one of the largest stones at Giza. The Wall of the Crow is highlighted in red on the sattelite image of Giza below.

Image 2001 Space Imaging Inc.

The azimuth of the prehistoric alignment of world wonders as it crosses over the Giza Plateau is five degrees north of due east. Although all of the pyramids and temples on the Giza Plateau are very precisely aligned with the cardinal directions, the Wall of the Crow is aligned five degrees north of due east and five degrees south of due west, in alignment with the line of ancient sites as it crosses over the Giza Plateau.

Image On Top of the World

The equidistant azimuthal projection below is oriented to the cardinal directions and centered on Giza. As a result, the angle of the line of ancient sites is the same as the azimuth of the line as it crosses over Giza. From left to right, the marked sites are Easter Island, Nazca, Ollantaytambo, Tassili n'Ajjer, Siwa, Giza, Petra, Ur, Perseopolis, Mohenjo Daro, Khajuraho, Pyay, Sukothai and Angkor.


The slope of the three pyramids at Giza from the apex of the Great Pyramid to the apex of the third pyramid is 9/7, which is an angle of 52 south of due west. Below is a panoramic image generated by Skyglobe, showing the position of Leo when Orion's belt was due south above the horizon at Giza, just before dawn on the spring equinox in 11,500 B.C. At this moment, when the angle of the three stars of Orion's belt above the horizon matched the angle of the three pyramids at Giza, the angle of the line from Regulus to Orion's belt is five degrees above the horizon, matching the angle of the Wall of the Crow and the azimuth of the prehistoric alignment of world wonders as it crosses over Giza.

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